Solutions For Essay Question

Let’s have a look at how to analyze the assignment question when analyzing the question there are three tasks to which you must pay attention firstly you need to locate the task words in the assignment question then you have to make sure that you understand what those task words are asking you to do and finally you need to identify the key topics in that particular assignment so firstly you must let Kent the tossed words often it’s very easy to find sometimes the task words will be things that analyze evaluate define here are some examples of typically set questions which you may encounter the first one analyze the problem of teenage binge drinking and evaluate three possible solutions here it’s very easy to find the task words we have analyzed and we have evaluate let’s have a look at another sample question evaluate the types of accounting information most companies routinely use.

Again the task word is upfront at the beginning evaluate now in some easy questions though you will find the task word isn’t quite so obvious let’s have a look at this example discuss the political strategies of the predominant forms of government among the Italian city-states which was the most successful and why right yeah you have to do three things firstly you must discuss the strategies this means give a description of the different strategies that becomes at the time the which was the most successful part of the question is asking you to evaluate which strategies you think worked best and the why part of the question requires you to give reasons for your evaluation here is another example of how the tossed words may not always be that easy to identify this read it pups new ribbon gear has recently lost market share what happened at pup stand why how can this problem be solved now the crux of this question is what happened at pups they won what it’s asking you to do is we look at the problem and assess the cause and once you’ve discussed what happened and why the second part of the questioning kicks in.

How can this problem be solved what you’ve been asked to do here is to evaluate the situation and give recommendations to solve the problem now there are a large number of task words these include evaluate a system contrast criticize define describe discuss examine explain many many more so for example if you are asked to discuss a topic your answer must explain the topic or concept and then give details through supporting evidence two examples points for and against explanations for the fence put forward from various points of view whereas if you are asked to criticize a topic you must point out the flaws or weaknesses in an argument or idea but also you are expected to indicate any positive aspects of the subject in question your answer mustn’t be biased and you should give a balanced answer.

Releasing Your Ideas

The paper’s like the printer at the end of the algorithm right for me writing is the way that you develop the ideas in the first place it’s the it’s the it’s the machinery of research not the output not the printer for research does that make sense that that’s what works for me let’s see and so if you’re going to do this number two is you need to know what your idea is and that is often not terribly clear in advance but it must be clear when it’s finished but I’d like to just articulate what what is this business about an idea. Develop your ideas on Edusson.

So I think of a paper as rather like a talk that I was making about on Tuesday as a kind of vehicle for conveying an idea from your head into what’s your name Fraser okay so my paper is a vehicle for conveying my idea from my head into phrases head right so it’s it’s like a virus I put the paper for me goes into his brain and if it’s successful it sort of tape smooth there and you know he becomes a carrier and he you know infects other people so it’s a and it it’s so it’s a the paper is not a sort of you know way of getting research brownie points it’s an idea conveying mechanism right and with a middle of phrase it’s not I put it in a rather what’s the word exactly done dystopian view but but I hope you’ll might hope the Fraser is sort of excited about the idea and think that’s cool and interesting.

And maybe I could build on it and do new things that and I put Mozart up here because I think of you know Mozart wrote pieces of music that we are still let’s think of them as his papers right and we are still reading his papers in concert halls right we just of course the the interpretation is you know huge huge part of musicianship but the fact is that the ideas that he wrote down was so persuasive and catchy and interesting that people are still looking at 100 years later or hundreds of years later I’ll be astonished if anybody’s looking at any of my papers in hundred years time but it will be VOC sightings they were so one yeah so so and and the ideas are more durable than anything else you know you may implement stuff you may give talks you may you may do a number of other things in the research but I think in a way that your papers are the most durable part of your output they are the things that future generations of students may read and think you know phrases paper really changed my life you know and I can point of some papers that did change my life so and that’s a in a way that implementations sometimes do but not so much so.

Creating with the Story Elements. Great Gatsby Part 3

Directions: Thinking about the story elements of character, setting, and plot in a novel is very important to understanding what is happening and why. Complete one of the following activities (part 1 and part 2) based on what you’ve read so far. Be creative and have fun!

Characters

Assume the character of
Daisy. Write a letter from
Daisy to Jordan in which she
reflects on her afternoon
at Nick’s house with Gatsby
and the tour of his home.
Be sure to include any of
her expectations, surprises,
and thoughts about the
days ahead.

Setting

Reread the party scene or the home
tour Gatsby gives to Daisy and Nick.
Create an advertising campaign for
the fashion designer responsible for
the most striking clothing, the interior
the designer who outfitted Gatsby’s
home, or the landscape architect
who designed the outdoor spaces
and gardens. Draft the voiceover
monologue for the product in a piece
of writing or a podcast. Create an
accompanying 2D visual using your
choice of medium (ink, paint, digital).

Plot

Write, perform, and, if possible, videotape a dialogue between
Dan Cody and the 17-year-old Gatsby, showing the nature of
their mentor/mentee relationship. How did Gatsby impress
Cody? How did Cody captivate Gatsby? Show the kind of
relationship you think they had. Detail any plans they may
have had before Cody’s untimely death.

Creating with the Story Elements. Great Gatsby Part 2

Directions: Thinking about the story elements of character, setting, and plot in a novel is very important to understanding what is happening and why. Complete one of the following activities (part 1 and part 3) based on what you’ve read so far. Be creative and have fun!

Characters

Create and perform or record
your version of the private
a dialogue between Jordan and
Gatsby during his party. Be
sure to include the story, Gatsby
tells Jordan and the favor he
asks her. Pay attention to
portraying their characters
through your choice of words

Setting

Create a soundtrack for the
scene where Gatsby and
Nick drive to New York City
together. Be sure to consider
the fancy automobile,
the changing scenery, the
conversation, and the two
characters as you make your
music selections.

Language

Write a found poem. Using favorite language you find
in chapters 3 and 4, draft a poem reflecting the novel
in some way. Your poem may connect to a character, a
theme, a place, or an event in the story.

Creating with the Story Elements. Great Gatsby

Directions: Thinking about the story elements of character, setting, and plot in a novel is very important to understanding what is happening and why. Complete one of the following activities (find others in the next posts) based on what you’ve read so far. Be creative and have fun!

Characters

Daisy talks with Nick about
her daughter. In explaining her
reaction to having a girl she says,
“‘All right’ I said, ‘I’m glad it’s a
girl. And I hope she’ll be a fool—
that’s the best thing a girl can be in
this world, a beautiful little fool.’”
Write a letter or poem from Daisy
to her daughter, giving advice or
describing hopes for her future.

Setting

Choose a key scene from
the novel to illustrate. Use
creative software (e.g.,
Photoshop or Microsoft Paint),
colored pencils, pastels,
oils, or acrylic paint. Be
sure to show through your
illustration the qualities of
mood and time Fitzgerald
attempted to convey through
his careful descriptions.

Plot

With a partner or small group, brainstorm five to eight predictions for the
novel. Use a graphic organizer. Main categories might be “Relationship
between Nick and Gatsby,” “Relationship between Daisy and Tom,” “How
will Gatsby fit into the story?” etc. Consider how these story elements might
shift and grow. Create a poster (digital or paper) showing your ideas and
the reasoning behind them. Share it with the class.

 

The Great Gatsby Chapter 1 Study Guide Answers

Here are the answers to the questions. BUT, use them only to check yourself!

 1. Who is Nick Carraway?

The Narrator, Daisy’s cousin, Tom’s old Yale classmate, Jordan’s love interest, Gatsby’s neighbor
2. Nick says, “I’m inclined to reserve all judgments,” and he claims it’s a matter of what? (p. 2)
Infinite hope

3. Gatsby had a “heightened sensitivity to” what? (p. 2)

The promises of life.
*Know this quote and be ready to talk about it on the final (p. 2):
“it was a readiness such as I have never found in any other person and which it is not likely I shall ever find again. No—Gatsby turned out all right in the end; it is what preyed on Gatsby, what foul dust floated in the wake of his dream that temporarily closed out my interest in the abortive sorrows and short-winded elations of men.”
4. How did Nick find his house? (p.3)

A young man at his office suggester that they take a house together in a commuting town, but at the last minute their firm ordered him to Washington, so Nick went to the country alone.
5. Where did Nick live and who was his neighbor? (p. 5)

 

West Egg (New Money) and Jay Gatsby
6. How does Nick know Daisy? How does he know Tom? (p. 5)

 

Daisy is Nick’s second cousin once removed. Nick knows Tom from college.
7. Describe the Buchanans’ house. (p. 6)

It was even more elaborate than Nick expected. It was a cheerful red-andwhite Georgian Colonial mansion that overlooked the bay. The lawn started at the beach and ran toward the front door for a quarter of a mile, jumping over
sun-dials and brick walls and burning gardens. It had French windows.
8. What is the first question Daisy asks Nick? (p. 9)

“Do they miss me?”
9. Every year Daisy waits for something, but misses it. What is it? (p. 11)

The longest day of the year.
10. Tom is reading a scientific book. What is it and who wrote it? (p.12-13)

The Rise of the Colored Empires by Godard.
11. What affected the butler’s nose? (p. 13)

His job of polishing silver.
12. What did Miss Baker tell Nick about Tom? (p.15)

That he’s got some woman in New York.
13. Nick tries to calm Daisy down by asking about her daughter. How does she respond? What did Nick miss, and why did he miss it? (p. 16)

She said that even though they are cousins, they don’t know each other very well. He missed her wedding because he was at war.
14. Daisy cried when she found out her baby was a girl. What thought calms her? (p. 17)

The hope that her daughter will be a beautiful, little fool.
15. What does Nick see when he comes home? How does he know not to call out? (p.20-21)

A figure that emerged from the shadow of his neighbor’s mansion and who was standing with his hands in his pockets regarding the silver pepper of the stars. Something about his leisurely movements suggested this was Gatsby. He gave a sudden intimation that he was content to be alone—he stretched out his arms toward the dark water in a curious way, and Nick could have sworn he

The Great Gatsby Chapter 1 Study Guide

Answer all Questions on the Answer Portion

1. Who is Nick Carraway?
2. Nick says, “I’m inclined to reserve all judgments,” and he claims it’s a matter of what? (p. 2)
3. Gatsby had a “heightened sensitivity to” what? (p. 2)
“it was a readiness such as I have never found in any other person and which it is not likely I shall ever find again. No—Gatsby turned out all right in the end; it is what preyed on Gatsby, what foul dust floated in the wake of his dream that temporarily closed out my interest in the abortive sorrows and short-winded elations of men.”
4. How did Nick find his house? (p. 3)
5. Where did Nick live and who was his neighbor? (p. 5)
6. How does Nick know Daisy? How does he know Tom? (p. 5)
7. Describe the Buchanans’ house. (p. 6)
8. What is the first question Daisy asks Nick? (p. 9)
9. Every year Daisy waits for something but misses it. What is it? (p. 11)
10. Tom is reading a scientific book. What is it and who wrote it? (p. 12-13)
11. What affected the butler’s nose? (p. 13)
12. What did Miss Baker tell Nick about Tom? (p. 15)
13.Nick tries to calm Daisy down by asking about her daughter. How does she respond? What did Nick miss and why did he miss it? (p. 16)
14. Daisy cried when she found out her baby was a girl. What thought calmed her? (p. 17)
15. What does Nick see when he comes home? How does he know not to call out? (p. 20-21)

To find out about The Great Gatsby Literary Terms read my previous post!

The Great Gatsby Literary Terms

Hey there! In this post, I would like to cover some of the literary terms that were used in the Great Gatsby novel. I hope you like it.

Hyperbole – the counterpart of understatement deliberately exaggerates conditions for emphasis or effect.
• “I’m p-paralyzed with happiness” (12)
• “The whole town is desolate. All the cars have the left wheel painted black as a mourning wreath, and there s a persistent wail all night along the north shore” (13) – Nick on the subject of people in Chicago missing Daisy.
Protagonist – The main character in a story, the one with whom the reader is meant to identify. The person is not necessarily “good” by any conventional moral standard, but he/she is the person in whose plight the reader is most invested.
• The protagonist in The Great Gatsby can be argued to either be Gatsby or Nick depending on whose plight the reader identifies with and invests in.
Allusion – a reference to a well-known person, place, event, literary work, or work of
art.
• “He was a son of God…and he must be about His Father’s business” (73) Motif – a recurring important idea or image. A motif differs from a theme in that it can be expressed as a single word or fragmentary phrase, while a theme usually must be expressed as a complete sentence.
• Geography serves as an important motif in The Great Gatsby as location helps to shape the novel’s themes and characters. (East Egg as odd upper-class traditions, West Egg as new money, celebrities, and wild lifestyles, and The valley of ashes as desperate and desolate)

Foreshadow – where future events in a story, or perhaps the outcome, are suggested by the author before they happen.
• “So we drove on toward death through the cooling twilight” (98) – This statement foreshadows Myrtle‟s death and the death of Gatsby’s dream.
Irony – where an event occurs which is unexpected, in the sense that it is somehow in absurd or mocking opposition to what would be expected or appropriate.
• Wolfshiem’s characterization as Jewish, yet the title of his office being “The Swastika Holding Company” (120)

Knowing Your Audience and Making Adjustments

When most people start writing an essay, they think of what they are writing about–the subject of the essay, the way it will transition, how they will introduce it, etc. What these people normally forget though is who they are writing for, which in most cases is actually more important than what they are writing about. You may be thinking, “How is that so? An essay is nothing without a subject.” This may be true, but an essay is just as unsuccessful if your professor doesn’t want to read it. Thinking about your audience is a crucial part for the writing process, and you can’t truly be a good essay writer without that consideration.

 

The term “audience” seems pretty self-explanatory since it’s just the group of people who will read an essay. But an audience is also a flexible group that you can mold to your liking. Your professor may not be flexible in this regard, but everyone else will be if you plan on publishing your essay at some point in time. Believe it or not, you have the power to choose who you want to read your essay. You can actually write in a way that will encourage certain people to read and discourage others. Granted, there is no guarantee that someone from another demographic won’t read your essay, but if you adjust your style enough you can at least guarantee that someone from the audience you are seeking will read your essay.

 

So how do you go about choosing the right audience? And better yet, what kind of adjustments do you have to make to fit each audience? Well the easiest thing to do is think about what your essay is about and who you want to reach with it. For instance, if you are writing an essay about problems in public schools, then your target audience is probably members of the school board and parents of school age children. This means that the language within the essay would need to sound more formal than if you were writing an essay geared towards teenage girls. By simply changing the tone of your words, you can reach a completely different group of people.

 

What’s great about making those subtle changes in the language of your writing is that you can rewrite the exact same essay to reach a different demographic. You could write an essay about investments that encourages teens to take a stake in the economy and change the language to make it persuade seniors to invest their retirement wisely. Both essays could be about investing in the economy, but the language of each could reach out to a different audience. If you are having trouble figuring out who you are writing for, just try changing the formality of the writing and see what kind of reaction it brings. The audience that reacts the strongest is probably the one that you should focus on.

 

Writing for a specific audience isn’t hard. It’s all a matter of molding your writing style to fit the personalities of your readers. Best rule to think about is that the older or smarter your audience is, the more formal your language needs to be. If you are trying to reach a wide range of people, then keep your style as generic and universal as possible. As long as you think about your readers through every step of the writing process, you will have very successful essays.

Skill Statement Part 2

“Hello, my name is Calvin Stewart. For the past year I’ve worked in a production machine shop using high-powered drills, sanders, and a CNC machine. One idea of mine saved my employer thousands of dollars in production costs.”

Important Skills to Include

These skills are used on many jobs. (For instance, almost half of all jobs require keeping records and maintaining files.) Employers will be looking for these skills when they hire. If you have these skills, include them in your skills statement:

  •         Use a computer
  •         Keep records and maintain files
  •         Apply interpersonal communication techniques
  •         Use computer keyboard
  •         Follow/give instructions
  •         Use correct grammar, punctuation and spelling
  •         Provide customer service
  •         Use word processing software
  •         Use spreadsheet software
  •         Prepare reports

Now Create Your Own

Now it’s time to create your own skills statement. If you have some of the skills listed above, include them. Here’s the three parts of your skills statement:

Part 1: Identify yourself.

Part 2: State briefly the skills you have or results you produced on past jobs that are important to the employers you are calling.

Part 3: Show how you have fit into other companies in the past or the personal qualities you have that are important to the job you want.

Skills Statement Practice

Once you have created your skills statement, it’s time to practice using it. Here are some ways to do that:

Sit with a positive and caring friend. Explain what a skills statement is and why you need one. Have your friend pretend to be an employer. Start by reading your skills statement. Repeat this process until you feel comfortable just saying it.

Use a tape recorder. Find a quiet place and pretend you are speaking to an employer. Imagine the details: the company name, the employer’s name, the job you want. Doing this makes this practice more effective. Now say your skills statement into the tape recorder. Repeat this several times before you play the tape back.

Stand in front of a mirror. Pretend you are speaking to an employer. Practice your skills statement until you feel comfortable.

Ways to use your skills statement

  1. At the beginning of an interview. A skills statement is a great ice-breaker.
  2. When an employer asks: “Tell me a little about yourself.” A skills statement describes you and your skills in a way that relates directly to an employer’s needs.
  3. When you do follow-up calls to employers. By repeating the skills statement, you refresh the employer’s memory.
  4. When you sit down to prepare a resume. Since your skills statement contains information that will be useful in a resume, it can help you get started.
  5. When you are on your way to an interview. Repeating your skills statement to yourself is a good way to get “pumped up” for an interview.