Creating with the Story Elements. Great Gatsby Part 3

Directions: Thinking about the story elements of character, setting, and plot in a novel is very important to understanding what is happening and why. Complete one of the following activities (part 1 and part 2) based on what you’ve read so far. Be creative and have fun!

Characters

Assume the character of
Daisy. Write a letter from
Daisy to Jordan in which she
reflects on her afternoon
at Nick’s house with Gatsby
and the tour of his home.
Be sure to include any of
her expectations, surprises,
and thoughts about the
days ahead.

Setting

Reread the party scene or the home
tour Gatsby gives to Daisy and Nick.
Create an advertising campaign for
the fashion designer responsible for
the most striking clothing, the interior
the designer who outfitted Gatsby’s
home, or the landscape architect
who designed the outdoor spaces
and gardens. Draft the voiceover
monologue for the product in a piece
of writing or a podcast. Create an
accompanying 2D visual using your
choice of medium (ink, paint, digital).

Plot

Write, perform, and, if possible, videotape a dialogue between
Dan Cody and the 17-year-old Gatsby, showing the nature of
their mentor/mentee relationship. How did Gatsby impress
Cody? How did Cody captivate Gatsby? Show the kind of
relationship you think they had. Detail any plans they may
have had before Cody’s untimely death.

Creating with the Story Elements. Great Gatsby Part 2

Directions: Thinking about the story elements of character, setting, and plot in a novel is very important to understanding what is happening and why. Complete one of the following activities (part 1 and part 3) based on what you’ve read so far. Be creative and have fun!

Characters

Create and perform or record
your version of the private
a dialogue between Jordan and
Gatsby during his party. Be
sure to include the story, Gatsby
tells Jordan and the favor he
asks her. Pay attention to
portraying their characters
through your choice of words

Setting

Create a soundtrack for the
scene where Gatsby and
Nick drive to New York City
together. Be sure to consider
the fancy automobile,
the changing scenery, the
conversation, and the two
characters as you make your
music selections.

Language

Write a found poem. Using favorite language you find
in chapters 3 and 4, draft a poem reflecting the novel
in some way. Your poem may connect to a character, a
theme, a place, or an event in the story.

Creating with the Story Elements. Great Gatsby

Directions: Thinking about the story elements of character, setting, and plot in a novel is very important to understanding what is happening and why. Complete one of the following activities (find others in the next posts) based on what you’ve read so far. Be creative and have fun!

Characters

Daisy talks with Nick about
her daughter. In explaining her
reaction to having a girl she says,
“‘All right’ I said, ‘I’m glad it’s a
girl. And I hope she’ll be a fool—
that’s the best thing a girl can be in
this world, a beautiful little fool.’”
Write a letter or poem from Daisy
to her daughter, giving advice or
describing hopes for her future.

Setting

Choose a key scene from
the novel to illustrate. Use
creative software (e.g.,
Photoshop or Microsoft Paint),
colored pencils, pastels,
oils, or acrylic paint. Be
sure to show through your
illustration the qualities of
mood and time Fitzgerald
attempted to convey through
his careful descriptions.

Plot

With a partner or small group, brainstorm five to eight predictions for the
novel. Use a graphic organizer. Main categories might be “Relationship
between Nick and Gatsby,” “Relationship between Daisy and Tom,” “How
will Gatsby fit into the story?” etc. Consider how these story elements might
shift and grow. Create a poster (digital or paper) showing your ideas and
the reasoning behind them. Share it with the class.

 

The Great Gatsby Chapter 1 Study Guide Answers

Here are the answers to the questions. BUT, use them only to check yourself!

 1. Who is Nick Carraway?

The Narrator, Daisy’s cousin, Tom’s old Yale classmate, Jordan’s love interest, Gatsby’s neighbor
2. Nick says, “I’m inclined to reserve all judgments,” and he claims it’s a matter of what? (p. 2)
Infinite hope

3. Gatsby had a “heightened sensitivity to” what? (p. 2)

The promises of life.
*Know this quote and be ready to talk about it on the final (p. 2):
“it was a readiness such as I have never found in any other person and which it is not likely I shall ever find again. No—Gatsby turned out all right in the end; it is what preyed on Gatsby, what foul dust floated in the wake of his dream that temporarily closed out my interest in the abortive sorrows and short-winded elations of men.”
4. How did Nick find his house? (p.3)

A young man at his office suggester that they take a house together in a commuting town, but at the last minute their firm ordered him to Washington, so Nick went to the country alone.
5. Where did Nick live and who was his neighbor? (p. 5)

 

West Egg (New Money) and Jay Gatsby
6. How does Nick know Daisy? How does he know Tom? (p. 5)

 

Daisy is Nick’s second cousin once removed. Nick knows Tom from college.
7. Describe the Buchanans’ house. (p. 6)

It was even more elaborate than Nick expected. It was a cheerful red-andwhite Georgian Colonial mansion that overlooked the bay. The lawn started at the beach and ran toward the front door for a quarter of a mile, jumping over
sun-dials and brick walls and burning gardens. It had French windows.
8. What is the first question Daisy asks Nick? (p. 9)

“Do they miss me?”
9. Every year Daisy waits for something, but misses it. What is it? (p. 11)

The longest day of the year.
10. Tom is reading a scientific book. What is it and who wrote it? (p.12-13)

The Rise of the Colored Empires by Godard.
11. What affected the butler’s nose? (p. 13)

His job of polishing silver.
12. What did Miss Baker tell Nick about Tom? (p.15)

That he’s got some woman in New York.
13. Nick tries to calm Daisy down by asking about her daughter. How does she respond? What did Nick miss, and why did he miss it? (p. 16)

She said that even though they are cousins, they don’t know each other very well. He missed her wedding because he was at war.
14. Daisy cried when she found out her baby was a girl. What thought calms her? (p. 17)

The hope that her daughter will be a beautiful, little fool.
15. What does Nick see when he comes home? How does he know not to call out? (p.20-21)

A figure that emerged from the shadow of his neighbor’s mansion and who was standing with his hands in his pockets regarding the silver pepper of the stars. Something about his leisurely movements suggested this was Gatsby. He gave a sudden intimation that he was content to be alone—he stretched out his arms toward the dark water in a curious way, and Nick could have sworn he

The Great Gatsby Chapter 1 Study Guide

Answer all Questions on the Answer Portion

1. Who is Nick Carraway?
2. Nick says, “I’m inclined to reserve all judgments,” and he claims it’s a matter of what? (p. 2)
3. Gatsby had a “heightened sensitivity to” what? (p. 2)
“it was a readiness such as I have never found in any other person and which it is not likely I shall ever find again. No—Gatsby turned out all right in the end; it is what preyed on Gatsby, what foul dust floated in the wake of his dream that temporarily closed out my interest in the abortive sorrows and short-winded elations of men.”
4. How did Nick find his house? (p. 3)
5. Where did Nick live and who was his neighbor? (p. 5)
6. How does Nick know Daisy? How does he know Tom? (p. 5)
7. Describe the Buchanans’ house. (p. 6)
8. What is the first question Daisy asks Nick? (p. 9)
9. Every year Daisy waits for something but misses it. What is it? (p. 11)
10. Tom is reading a scientific book. What is it and who wrote it? (p. 12-13)
11. What affected the butler’s nose? (p. 13)
12. What did Miss Baker tell Nick about Tom? (p. 15)
13.Nick tries to calm Daisy down by asking about her daughter. How does she respond? What did Nick miss and why did he miss it? (p. 16)
14. Daisy cried when she found out her baby was a girl. What thought calmed her? (p. 17)
15. What does Nick see when he comes home? How does he know not to call out? (p. 20-21)

To find out about The Great Gatsby Literary Terms read my previous post!

The Great Gatsby Literary Terms

Hey there! In this post, I would like to cover some of the literary terms that were used in the Great Gatsby novel. I hope you like it.

Hyperbole – the counterpart of understatement deliberately exaggerates conditions for emphasis or effect.
• “I’m p-paralyzed with happiness” (12)
• “The whole town is desolate. All the cars have the left wheel painted black as a mourning wreath, and there s a persistent wail all night along the north shore” (13) – Nick on the subject of people in Chicago missing Daisy.
Protagonist – The main character in a story, the one with whom the reader is meant to identify. The person is not necessarily “good” by any conventional moral standard, but he/she is the person in whose plight the reader is most invested.
• The protagonist in The Great Gatsby can be argued to either be Gatsby or Nick depending on whose plight the reader identifies with and invests in.
Allusion – a reference to a well-known person, place, event, literary work, or work of
art.
• “He was a son of God…and he must be about His Father’s business” (73) Motif – a recurring important idea or image. A motif differs from a theme in that it can be expressed as a single word or fragmentary phrase, while a theme usually must be expressed as a complete sentence.
• Geography serves as an important motif in The Great Gatsby as location helps to shape the novel’s themes and characters. (East Egg as odd upper-class traditions, West Egg as new money, celebrities, and wild lifestyles, and The valley of ashes as desperate and desolate)

Foreshadow – where future events in a story, or perhaps the outcome, are suggested by the author before they happen.
• “So we drove on toward death through the cooling twilight” (98) – This statement foreshadows Myrtle‟s death and the death of Gatsby’s dream.
Irony – where an event occurs which is unexpected, in the sense that it is somehow in absurd or mocking opposition to what would be expected or appropriate.
• Wolfshiem’s characterization as Jewish, yet the title of his office being “The Swastika Holding Company” (120)